What's It Called?

Glossary of windows & doors terms

New to window and door talk? Let Milgard help you with the terminology. Below are diagrams of popular window and door styles with different parts highlighted. Other types of windows and doors might have slightly different components.

Double Hung Window

Double Hung

  1. Head – The main horizontal member which forms the top of the window frame.
  2. Grids – Exterior and interior grid options are available with some windows to better simulate real divided lites.
  3. Hardware – Window locks and operating handles.
  4. Weather-stripping – Weather-stripping is essential to ensure efficient, weather tight seals for your windows.
  5. Insulated Glass – A combination of two or more panes of glass with a hermetically sealed air space between them. 
  6. Upper Sash – A single assembly of stiles (sides) and rails (top and bottom) made into a frame for holding insulated glass. The top sash is known as the Upper sash.
  7. Jamb – The window frame sections forming the top, sides and bottom of a window frame.
  8. Lower Sash – A single assembly of stiles (sides) and rails (top and bottom) made into a frame for holding insulated glass. The bottom sash is known as the Lower sash.
  9. Sill – The horizontal section (ledge) forming the bottom of the window frame.

 

Sliding Door

Sliding Door

 

  1. Head – The main horizontal member which forms the top of the sliding door frame.
  2. Interlocking Meeting rail
  3. Sill – The main horizontal member forming the bottom of the sliding door frame.
  4. Operable panel - the door panel that opens and closes.
  5. Insulated Glass – A combination of two or more panes of glass with a hermetically sealed air space between them.
  6. Hardware– Door locks and operating handles. Talk to your dealer or contractor about stainless-steel hardware that meets or exceeds the forced-entry codes in your area.
  7. Jamb –The patio door frame members forming the top, sides and bottom of a sliding door frame.

 

 

 

 

 

French Patio Door

French Patio Door

  1. Head – The main horizontal member which forms the top of the sliding door frame.
  2. Handle-Activated Locking System – Many patio doors use a handle-activated lock system. A multi-point lock system provides extra security, fastens your door securely in place and prevents warping brought on by the elements.
  3. Insulated Glass – A combination of two or more panes of glass with a hermetically sealed air space between them.
  4. Lock Stile– The patio door vertical structural member which closes against the jamb of the surrounding frame; on the opposite side from the hinges.
  5. Hardware– Door locks and operating handles. Talk to your dealer or contractor about stainless-steel hardware that meets or exceeds the forced-entry codes in your area.
  6. Weather Stripping– Weather-stripping is essential to ensure efficient, weather tight seals for your door.
  7. Sill– The main horizontal member forming the bottom of the patio door frame.
  8. Top Rail– The top horizontal structural member of the patio door frame.
  9. Hinge– A device that allows the turning or pivoting of a part on a stationary frame.
  10. Hinge Stile– The patio door vertical structural member where the door pivots; found on the same side of the hinges.
  11. Jamb –The patio door frame members forming the top, sides and bottom of a sliding door frame.
  12. Bottom Rail–The bottom structural member of the patio door frame.

 

More information

Learn what type of glass can give you the energy efficient performance you need. In addition, discover popular options for glass aesthetics.
Discover options to select frames for a traditional or contemporary look and get tips on coordinating frame color to home décor.
What to keep in mind as you select hardware for new windows and doors.
Liven up the look of your home from the inside and out with grid patterns.
Designed to cover the opening of a window, screens keep the insects out while letting fresh air in.

Wondering what kind of windows or doors fits you? Take a quiz to find out.

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